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Archive for October, 2012

Top 10 Training Mistakes

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On October 25, 2012 NO COMMENTS

Being tasked with building or managing a training organization is a larger-than-life responsibility. Mistakes will happen – but here are the ten most common training mistakes and how to avoid them.

Building and managing a training department is a difficult task. Mistakes can be made in many areas of training and development, but there are some common mistakes that you and your staff can avoid. Here are the top ten training mistakes – from development and delivery to funding.

One: Setting up the expectation that each training participant will end up with exactly the same knowledge. Adults learn in different ways and focus on different material. When that happens, Participant #1 may have a different knowledge base than Participant #2 when the training is complete. To avoid this problem, provide your students a general outline of what’s covered in training and what they are expected to learn.

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Adult Education vs. Corporate eLearning

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On October 18, 2012 NO COMMENTS

Far too often corporate management and human resource departments confuse these two types of training programs.  While the objectives of both may be similar, the path that they each take is dramatically different.

Corporate eLearning is focused on training and not necessarily education. The goal of eLearning is to transfer knowledge to the user in the most efficient way possible (i.e., performance improvement).

Adult education, on the other hand is not always performance based.  At the low end, it serves to bring up the bottom of the company staff.  Teaching basics like reading, writing and arithmetic.  It might serve as education on introducing basic concepts on computer use, or a how-to for computer tools like Excel or Word.  The goal of most adult education is not necessarily proficiency but basic knowledge.

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Training Mojo: Stretching Your Training Dollar by Mixing Internal and External Tools and Programs

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On October 11, 2012 NO COMMENTS

Summary: You can stretch your training dollar by carefully analyzing and choosing both internal and external tools and programs.

Training departments should always maintain a certain budget-consciousness – in both good and not-so-good financial circumstances. You can stretch your budget by examining needs and being aware that a mix of external and internal resources are available. Here are some ways to do that.

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Training Mojo: Developing a Culture of Training by Getting Buy-In From Stakeholders and Staff

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On October 4, 2012 NO COMMENTS

Summary: Looking for a way to bring your training department to the next level? Create a training culture by obtaining buy-in from stakeholders and staff.When the training department is up and running and your courses are being delivered regularly, does that translate into your firm having a training culture? Without buy-in from stakeholders and training staff, you don’t. Here are some ways to create the culture by involving stakeholders and your staff.

Your department’s stakeholders are often subject-matter-experts in the field – they could be the company’s executives, department managers, and even high performers. Far too often, training programs are developed and delivered without any input from this important group. To avoid that mistake, involve your stakeholders from the beginning, with the development of your training. Ask them what material should be covered in your courses. Obtain step-by-step procedures from the subject-matter-experts and stakeholders. Gain approval from the executives with a simple but clear explanation of what is going to be covered in a training course and program. Your benefit is twofold: first, you’re getting stakeholder buy-in. Second, you’re getting the most accurate, field-worthy information to include in your training.

Now that you have stakeholders involved in development, don’t leave them at the door of the classroom.

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