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Archive for the ‘LMS’ Category

Measuring Success (ROI) of a Training MOOC, Part 2

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On February 17, 2014 NO COMMENTS

Press Online button.Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are a rising trend in corporate and workplace training. The courses are still fairly new, and many questions remain to be answered. Currently, one of the hottest topics is how to measure the success of a MOOC. Although once everything is up and running, the marginal cost associated with MOOCs can approach zero, they still require significant upfront investments of both time and money. Organizations interested in using MOOCs as part of their training programs need to have a clear idea of the benefits they will realize—preferably reflected in their bottom line.

In the previous post, I outlined the four-level model of evaluation developed by Donald Kirkpatrick. Here, we’ll explore how MOOCs and the data that comes out of them can be used to measure success at each of these four levels.

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Peer Learning and MOOCs: Using Technology to Maximize Employee Learning

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On December 16, 2013 NO COMMENTS

MOOCHow much of their essential job skills and knowledge are people in your organization learning from one another? 10%? 20%? Probably closer to 80%. Do you know what they are learning? Does it align with the goals of your training program? Well, that may be difficult to judge, but one thing is certain: they will remember it. Regardless of how much time and energy you put into creating content and designing your training, your employees will learn more from their peers. In a previous set of articles, we looked at the advantages of using a massive open online course (MOOC) to incorporate informal learning into training programs. Here we will focus more specifically on peer learning and how a MOOC can be used to facilitate, structure, and assess it.

Peer learning is a powerful learning tool, but one that is largely unharnessed in any organized way, often because of the belief that it does not allow for very tight control. One method that many companies have embraced is mentorship, and research has shown that employees who have mentors feel more supported by the organization, show stronger organizational commitment, and are more likely to stay. But peer learning takes place in many other ways—people give one another advice, opinions, and ad hoc lessons all of the time, over email, the phone, and even the water cooler. Although these interactions are casual, they nevertheless account for a large amount of organizational learning, and companies can benefit from not only encouraging but also facilitating them.

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MOOCs, Games, and the Brain

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On December 2, 2013 NO COMMENTS

brain & blue bokeh abstract light background. Vector illustration / eps10It seems like at least once a week there is a major news headline declaring that our educational system is broken, and looking at the data on how U.S. students compare with students in other countries, it is hard to doubt that this conclusion is true. The training system is broken as well. Results from an ASTD study suggest that as much as 90 percent of new skills learned during training are lost within one year, which means that despite large expenditures on training programs, many companies are not realizing significant returns on their investment (ROIs). What’s worse, many companies do not systematically analyze these ROIs, so they really have no idea what they are getting for their training dollars. Part of the problem is that the traditional models of education and training aren’t brain-friendly, meaning that they are completely removed from how people actually learn. For many years (and even centuries), the commonly held belief was that exposure to information equaled learning. But this simply isn’t true: spending an hour listening to a classroom lecture or attending a four-hour seminar with no follow-up does not translate into meaningful learning, yet this remains the dominant model in many organizations.

There is some good news to be had in all of this: broken systems open the door for innovation, and that is exactly what is happening right now in education and training. Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have swooped onto the scene, threatening commonly held beliefs and business models left, right, and center. I’ve said before that the main influence of MOOCs is pedagogical—they are changing the focus from knowledge to outcomes, from what students know to what they will be able to do. Using MOOC tools, instructors can design courses that do translate into meaningful learning because they are more closely aligned with how people actually learn.

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How to MOOC: Meaningful Assessment Through Real-World Problem Solving

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On November 25, 2013 NO COMMENTS

MOOCSo far in this series, we have looked at ways massive open online courses (MOOCs) have led educators and trainers to rethink how content is delivered and the role of social media in the corporate classroom. This article focuses on a topic that has historically been an albatross around the neck of training and development: assessment.

Assessment in corporate training is complicated by a couple of factors. First, there is a widespread misconception that exposure to information equals learning. The result has been an overabundance of objective testing methods that assess information recall but little else. This practice is probably responsible for the fact that employees retain only about 10 to 15 percent of what they learn in training sessions—information is easily forgotten; only when we apply that information does it become knowledge. The second complicating factor is even more troubling: many organizations don’t assess employee learning at all. In an interview with the Wall Street Journal last year, corporate training researcher Eduardo Salas noted that one of the biggest mistakes businesses make in training is failing to evaluate employee learning. If they do, he says, “they usually stop at the first level of evaluation—the reaction data. Companies think that if there is a positive reaction to the training, people will learn. But what we know is that the correlation is very week between reaction to training and actual learning.”

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How to MOOC: Social Media in the Corporate Classroom, Part 2

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On August 19, 2013 NO COMMENTS

Global computer network. Hi-res digitally generated image.So you are ready to design your own massive open online course (MOOC) and you want to incorporate social media. How should you go about it? What tools should you use? When the first MOOCs hit the net, the only real option was blogs. Then Coursera, Udacity, and edX popularized discussion boards, similar to what is used in non-MOOC elearning. Since then, social learning tools have exploded onto the market. At a minimum, most MOOCs today use discussion boards, blogs, and microblogs, and many have some kind of dedicated social network.

Training MOOCs are by nature different than academic MOOCs. One difference that affects the use of social media is the potential audience and the type of content. Organizations need to decide whether to make their MOOCs truly open and host them publicly on the Internet or whether to restrict part or all of the courses to authorized users. The deciding factor may be the amount of proprietary or competitive information included in the course content. For example, a business etiquette course may be hosted on the Internet, while a sales training course may be run on a private intranet. Different social media tools are available depending on whether or not the training will be made public

Another difference is the number of social media tools used in a given course. In some MOOCs (particularly connectivist MOOCs), learners are encouraged to connect with each other over as many platforms as possible. In a course with tens of thousands of students, this can lead to an overwhelming amount of information being posted, so most students pick and choose how they will engage with the content and one another. In a training MOOC, this model may or may not be appropriate. To prevent learners from spending all day surfing social media sites, instructors can limit the tools to a couple of platforms or divide learners into small groups for discussion and collaboration.

The following presents a review of the main types of social media and how they can be used in training MOOCs.

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How to MOOC: Social Media in the Corporate Classroom, Part 1

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On August 12, 2013 NO COMMENTS

Global computer network. Hi-res digitally generated image.Over the past few months, we have explored the social component of massive open online courses (MOOCs) from several angles. We have examined the role of peer learning in organizations and the importance of creating personal learning networks. We have also reviewed the major technology-enabled learning tools that MOOCs use to support social interaction. In this article and the next, we will put it all together by looking at why businesses should use social media in their training and development programs and various practical ways to implement peer learning through social media in corporate MOOCs.

Many organizations are wary of social media, mainly because of a lack of control and the fear that social networking on the job will quickly devolve into “social notworking.” This fear is probably largely unfounded—companies were also suspicious about email and the Internet, but there is little doubt (and a lot of empirical research) that these innovations have improved, not harmed, productivity. In today’s environment, businesses that do not adopt new technologies are setting themselves up for failure. According to a 2012 Capgemini report, digital leaders—defined as those companies that use new technologies such as social media, mobile technologies, and analytics—are 26 percent more profitable than their competitors and generate both more revenue and higher market valuation ratios.

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How to MOOC: Technology-Enabled Learning Tools, Part 2

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On June 10, 2013 NO COMMENTS

Web 2.0 and the rapid rise of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, andMOOC other communications platforms have made one thing abundantly clear: Everything is social. And researchers, educators, and trainers have begun to realize that learning is no exception. As the workforce grows to include more Millennials – digital natives who spend nearly four hours per day on social networking sites – the social impact on training cannot be overstated. According to a 2011 ASTD report, social media enables learning by providing platforms for people to exchange information, facilitating communication, personalizing the learning experience, and supporting informal learning.

Social media integration is one of the main advantages of MOOCs over traditional e-learning models, and MOOCs offer many ways to incorporate social media into training programs:

  • Discussion boards. Course discussion forums are the most basic type of social platform used in MOOCs, but they are powerful tools and almost all MOOCs have them. Discussion boards provide spaces for learners to ask and answer questions and hold conversations about the course content. Participation in discussions is often one of the requirements for course completion. These forums have an advantage over in-class discussions as participants have more time to reflect on course materials and formulate their ideas and contributions. Discussion forums are most effective as learning tools when they are actively monitored and directed by instructors. Most learning management systems (LMSs) have discussion board modules.

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How to MOOC: Technology-Enabled Learning Tools, Part 1

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On June 7, 2013 NO COMMENTS

Just in case you’ve been under a rock lately, here is a newsMOOC update: the nature of training is changing, and fast! The recent explosion of massive open online courses (MOOCs) in higher education has brought with it a whole new set of technology-enabled learning tools. Education and training are no longer delivered exclusively in closed classrooms by experts, and learning is no longer something people do in isolation surrounded by textbooks. Today, through computers and mobile devices, education can happen anywhere and at any time, and learning involves students not only actively engaging with the content, but also using various tools and platforms to interact with instructors and fellow learners. In the education sector, this is known as Learning 2.0, and the corporate sector needs to be prepared: Training 2.0 is coming.

What exactly does this mean?

There continues to be plenty of controversy surrounding MOOCs, but one thing we can all agree on is they are changing the way we think about education. The main drivers and implications of this change are huge improvements and innovations in learning technologies. Technology-enabled learning tools are not a panacea, but they can go a long way toward solving many of the challenges facing training departments today, including high costs, a lack of qualified employees, the rapidly changing business and technology landscapes, and long training development times coupled with the need to educate employees quickly. Over the course of two articles, we will examine the main “MOOC tools” – online technologies that have made it possible to deliver highly engaging training programs to any number of employees, anywhere, at any time.

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Rapid Elearning and MOOCs: Keeping Up with Change

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On June 3, 2013 NO COMMENTS

Technology is changing at an exponential rate. Think just about Global blue Computer Networkthe past year or so: mobile devices now outnumber people, online entertainment is rapidly eclipsing television watching, and you no longer have to leave your house to earn a degree. These changes have an impact on businesses in all sectors, but because of the intense pace, it is not always possible to develop new training courses or schedule employee training days fast enough. Companies that are not able to keep up with the all of the changes quickly find themselves on the sidelines. So, how can organizations help their workforce keep informed of the latest innovations so that they can remain competitive? Enter the “rapid elearning MOOC.”

The idea of rapid elearning has been around since 2004. The concept was developed by Jennifer de Vries of Bersin and Associates in response to a survey whose findings showed that 89% of organizations needed to create elearning in three weeks or less. And that was nearly 10 years ago – the current climate demands even more efficiency in training development. But so far, it doesn’t appear that training has been able to keep up: a 2009 ASTD survey showed that it took anywhere from 93 to 356 hours to develop a single hour of training content depending on the tools used and the level of interactivity. With the current rate of change, 93 to 356 hours is simply too long.

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What Type of MOOC Is Right For You?

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On May 15, 2013 NO COMMENTS

So, your company has decided to “go MOOC.” What now? Global blue Computer NetworkThere are many options to consider when implementing a MOOC into a training program. The first, and most important, decision is what type of MOOC to use. Although the MOOC model popularized by Coursera is considered the standard format (mainly because Coursera is so big), it is not the only option, and it may not be the best option for your organization. MOOCs differ greatly in delivery format, the active engagement of learners, and the types of outcomes they can produce. Which style of MOOC is most effective depends on the training goals of the organization and the learning outcomes the employees are expected to achieve.

UK elearning entrepreneur Donald Clark has categorized MOOCs into eight different types based on their pedagogical approach and the needs of learners. This taxonomy is useful in determining the right type of MOOC for different training needs.

Transfer MOOCs

Transfer MOOCs lie at the “most traditional” end of the MOOC spectrum. These are courses designed for classroom delivery that have been put onto a MOOC platform. Most of Coursera’s offerings are transfer MOOCs. These courses deliver content primarily through “talking heads” videos and assigned readings and they assess learning outcomes using online quizzes and tests. This type of MOOC would work best for training for which the main goal is knowledge transfer, such as employee orientation and business etiquette training.

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