• Get New Articles Sent to You!

  •  
Posts Tagged ‘elearning delivery’

7-Steps to Creating an Effective E-learning Program Part 2: Convert and Create Content

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On March 10, 2012 NO COMMENTS

You’ve taken the time to assess your content, learners, and overall system requirements. The next step is to understand how to build and deliver e-learning content. In regard to converting existing content, the task is not as simple as dumping pages into an online learning management system or content builder application. The conversion takes careful planning and adherence to some general standards on content. The creation of new content is somewhat easier – as long as you know the standards. Let’s discuss content and delivery.

E-learning content, as we’ve seen previously, is a completely different concept than traditional learning material. First, online content should be brief and must not wander. “Wandering” content is somewhat more acceptable in traditional learning materials, because typically participants take the written materials with them as references. In online learning, the participant is going to learn what content is directed their way and they are probably not going to take anything with them. You can develop content in a brief format by trying to keep each frame to 70 words or less. With this guide, you can also be sure that your content is to the point, that is, in the realm of “need to know” versus “nice to know”. Training managers and instructional designers must exercise quite a bit of editorial license to prepare traditional materials for transfer to e-learning platforms.

Click here to continue reading


Learning Management System Basics (LMS)

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On February 22, 2010 NO COMMENTS

A Learning Management System (LMS) can provide tremendous benefits both for the training department and for the organization in general. There are numerous choices for LMS providers, as well as functionalities, so an LMS implementation project can become quite confusing. Just what are the LMS basics and how can a system help your organization?

To start with, let’s discuss what an LMS really is. In basic terms, the LMS is a system that helps you deliver and manage training in numerous formats. One of the first misconceptions about an LMS is that it is used solely for the delivery of online courses. While this is an important component, it is not the only reason to use an LMS. The LMS consists of a few separate parts. First, the management system consists of the tracking and reporting of the organization and individual learning activities. Second, the content authoring system (or LCMS) allows the training department to create and or upload its own in-house or purchased learning content and courses, and the third part is the content and courses themselves.

Click here to continue reading


Learning Management System Basics (LMS)

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On April 21, 2009 NO COMMENTS

Learning Management SystemA Learning Management System (LMS) can provide tremendous benefits both for the training department and for the organization in general. There are numerous choices for LMS providers, as well as functionalities, so an LMS implementation project can become quite confusing. Just what are the LMS basics and how can a system help your organization?

To start with, let’s discuss what an LMS really is. In basic terms, the LMS is a system that helps you deliver and manage training in numerous formats. One of the first misconceptions about an LMS is that it is used solely for the delivery of online courses. While this is an important component, it is not the only reason to use an LMS. The LMS consists of a few separate parts. First, the management system consists of the tracking and reporting of the organization and individual learning activities. Second, the content authoring system (or LCMS) allows the training department to create and or upload its own in-house or purchased learning content and courses, and the third part is the content and courses themselves.

Click here to continue reading