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Posts Tagged ‘eLearning’

Why Your Existing E-Learning is Failing, and How MOOCs Can Help

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On August 12, 2014 NO COMMENTS

elearning_failDigital learning environments, like e-learning, online training, and massive open online courses (MOOCs), have without a doubt been the biggest influencers on corporate training practice over the past several years. According to recent statistics, 80% of organizations offer online training and companies that have adopted e-learning have realized significant benefits, including 60% reduction in training time.

But while traditional e-learning may offer improvements over instructor-led training, from a learner’s perspective, it still leaves much to be desired. As this Learn Dash infographic shows, e-learners become frustrated by many aspects of their courses, including:

  • Finding lists of procedures and regulations tedious (76%)
  • Getting bored with the courses (38%)
  • Hating it when the pace is too fast or too slow (37%)

In the previous post, we explored how MOOCs can improve on instructor-led training and traditional e-learning in terms of saving organizations both time and money. But of course the ultimate goal of training is have your employees learn something, which requires keeping them engaged.

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Rapid Elearning and MOOCs: Keeping Up with Change

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On June 3, 2013 NO COMMENTS

Technology is changing at an exponential rate. Think just about Global blue Computer Networkthe past year or so: mobile devices now outnumber people, online entertainment is rapidly eclipsing television watching, and you no longer have to leave your house to earn a degree. These changes have an impact on businesses in all sectors, but because of the intense pace, it is not always possible to develop new training courses or schedule employee training days fast enough. Companies that are not able to keep up with the all of the changes quickly find themselves on the sidelines. So, how can organizations help their workforce keep informed of the latest innovations so that they can remain competitive? Enter the “rapid elearning MOOC.”

The idea of rapid elearning has been around since 2004. The concept was developed by Jennifer de Vries of Bersin and Associates in response to a survey whose findings showed that 89% of organizations needed to create elearning in three weeks or less. And that was nearly 10 years ago – the current climate demands even more efficiency in training development. But so far, it doesn’t appear that training has been able to keep up: a 2009 ASTD survey showed that it took anywhere from 93 to 356 hours to develop a single hour of training content depending on the tools used and the level of interactivity. With the current rate of change, 93 to 356 hours is simply too long.

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The Death of eLearning

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On December 31, 2012 NO COMMENTS

It is with a sad note that I am the learning physician that has to declare that elearning rip(as it now exists) is dead.  I am positive that many of you are going to say “WHAT”?   eLearning has had a long illustrious life.  As a baby, it was nothing more than a mail-order course delivered to interested individuals.  As it grew up, the teenage years were expressed as computer-based-learning programs that were sent by disk.  This was a huge expansion to the development of elearning as a youth.  It created a distribution process that was previously unparallelled.  It was a great youth experience.

As an adult, elearning showed its capabilities when it was delivered on the internet.  With its capability to be available 24/7 and global delivery, it was just about everything that one could possibly hope for.

As it aged, it learned new tools to increase engagement.  It successfully changed it self from paper reading to computer screen reading to browser based reading, but it still was nothing more than reading on a different platform.  It did learn to add some fancy graphics as well as some novel java and flash tools to increase engagement, but it continued to suffer from a position of isolation.  There was not much it could do that would to engage a collective of participants.

This isolation is what caused it’s unfortunate death.  It reached millions of individuals, but could not  find a way to assist them to learn as a group or community.  eLearning is is mourned by its spouse Content Creation Tools and their children MOOC, edx, Coursera and udacity.

 

Copyright 2012 Bryant Nielson. All Rights Reserved.

Bryant Nielson – Managing Director of CapitalWave Inc.– offers 25+ years of training and talent management for executives, business owners, and top performing sales executives in taking the leap from the ordinary to extraordinary. Bryant is a entrepreneur, trainer, and strategic training adviser for many organizations. Bryant’s business career has been based on his results-oriented style of empowering the individual.

Learn more about Bryant at LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/bryantnielson

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Corporate Training Choices Explained

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On December 13, 2012 NO COMMENTS

There are many types of corporate training.  People often ask what type of training is best. While on the surface, it may seem that there is a reasonable response, the program is more problematic.  Each type of training has inherent strengths and weaknesses.  Sometimes the question of which type of training is best is correctly answered by the identification with an assessment of the needs-based purpose for the training.

With each of the following training systems, I have provided a brief explanation and a summary of the pros and cons for each.

Manual (self-training): The presentation of material, hopefully organized, is generally given to a staff member to basically self train.  A summary of this training system are:

Strengths:

  • Cheap & Easy

Weaknesses:

  • Inability to measure learning.
  • Requires self-imposed focus
  • Little interaction

On-the-Job Training (OJT): Generally used by many corporations for training.  It is a mix of manual training, combined with direct oversight by a mix of management and experienced staff. 

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Top 10 Training Myths

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On November 15, 2012 NO COMMENTS

Keep your training department and its customers knowledgeable by avoiding the Top Ten Training Myths. Training departments are sometimes viewed as being out of touch with the rest of the organization. Because of this, beliefs or myths about training, its functions, and its results tend to develop both within the department and outside it. To keep your training department and its customers knowledgeable, avoid these ten training myths.
One: If training content is exactly the same each time, each group of participants will end up with the same knowledge. We can take every precaution to make sure training is delivered exactly the same every time – it’s a good practice and will maintain consistency. But remember that adults learn differently. Your learners will “hear” different things, focus on different aspects of the material, and lose focus at different times. Don’t promise managers that everyone will know the same thing. Instead, give them an overall picture of what is covered in the material.

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Adult Education vs. Corporate eLearning

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On October 18, 2012 NO COMMENTS

Far too often corporate management and human resource departments confuse these two types of training programs.  While the objectives of both may be similar, the path that they each take is dramatically different.

Corporate eLearning is focused on training and not necessarily education. The goal of eLearning is to transfer knowledge to the user in the most efficient way possible (i.e., performance improvement).

Adult education, on the other hand is not always performance based.  At the low end, it serves to bring up the bottom of the company staff.  Teaching basics like reading, writing and arithmetic.  It might serve as education on introducing basic concepts on computer use, or a how-to for computer tools like Excel or Word.  The goal of most adult education is not necessarily proficiency but basic knowledge.

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Training Alchemy: 5 Disruptive Training Technologies

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On March 13, 2010 NO COMMENTS

Using technology in training can be disruptive – but answer these questions and you can turn disruption into efficient and advanced training.

Today’s training can be enhanced – or disrupted, by new advances in technology such as Computer Based Training (CBT), elearning or Web Based Training (WBT), video and audio webinars, and the use of metric dashboards. In order to use technology effectively, you have to ask a few questions and understand how to use each of the technologies offered.

First, you should ask if the chosen technology is appropriate to the material. Many training organizations use technology simply because it’s there and not because it works for the learning intervention at hand. You can ask yourself if participants will likely have questions about the material – and how they can be answered if there is not a live person around. For example, highly technical information with various outcomes may not be appropriate for CBT or WBT, but may be appropriate for a video webinar, where participants can see and hear an instructor. Informational pieces with electronic resources such as websites or other documents are certainly appropriate for CBT or WBT. It may seem efficient to take the human element out of training, but remember to look at the long-term effects.

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25 Top Learning & Development Posts of 2009

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On December 30, 2009 NO COMMENTS

Here are 25 Learning & Development posts (excepting all of my posts of course) over the last year.

  1. 9 Free Tools to build better e-learning
  2. Top 10 Videos that inspire us to rethink the way we learn
  3. 13 Tips to help you record narration like a pro
  4. What training costs: Converting content from ILT to WBT
  5. Top 100 eLearning items: eLearning Technology
  6. The 10 Commandments for eLearning
  7. Learning Strategies that you can use
  8. eLearning is not the answer
  9. The Myth of “Best Practices”
  10. ADDIE is Dead!  Long live ADDIE!
  11. 7 invaluable thoughts about Film Making that apply to Instructional Design too.
  12. Principles of eLearning
  13. 50 Practical Tips & Tricks to build better eLearning
  14. 10 online icebreakers
  15. 10 Strategies for Integrating Learning and Work (part 1)
  16. Learning for the 21st Century
  17. Top 50 Mobile Learning Resources
  18. 12 eLearning Predictions for 2009
  19. Free eLearning Events
  20. Why you want to use scenarios in your eLearning
  21. Social vs. Not – Pictorally
  22. How Long Does It Take to Develop One Hour of E-Learning-Updated for 200
  23. Jane Bozarth: Better than Bullet Points
  24. Top tips for managing an e-learning project
  25. The Standalone LMS is Dead

There are many more, but these 25 impacted my view of eLearning and hopefully will influence yours.


Preparing For the Move to E-learning

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On March 20, 2009 NO COMMENTS
eLearning Image

eLearning Image

During tough times, a learning organization may need to make a move into e learning – the cost is lower, the maintenance is less expensive, and the personnel requirement is lower, as well. If your organization is about to make this migration, consider vital elements in three areas before you move forward: preparedness, pre-migration, and migration.

Before you actually prepare to move your organization to e learning, the first thing you should do is analyze the current organizational culture when it comes to learning. Through this analysis, you’ll discover the organization’s level of preparedness for e learning. Is there even an “e” element in the organization? Are all levels of associates accustomed to email contact and basic computer usage, or do their jobs not require this kind of contact? If there is no “e” element, you may want to consider introducing e learning at a very slow pace to allow people to get used to the idea and the access. Of course, if your organization is tech-savvy already, this part of a migration is usually easier.

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Flexible, Scalable, Reliable and Accountable

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On November 23, 2008 NO COMMENTS

I recently finished meeting with the President of a large training company [specialists in the manufacturing training business]. Our conversation was related to the development of an eLearning system for his training company. After a lengthy discussion, I realized that he was either unable or unwilling to expand the training systems that they utilize with their customers. Surprisingly, it was very troubling.He explained to me that their current training system was primarily class-room based, but also included some 1-to-1 training for his clients. When questioned about why not including web-based solutions to his training mix, he responded that he:

“… do not see any value to web based training.”

I was floored, no value? I stammered for a moment. I then attempted to explain to him that some of the values of web-based training are:

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