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Posts Tagged ‘Employee development’

Hiring a Chief Learning Officer?

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On December 6, 2012 NO COMMENTS

This past month has been a busy one.  I have found myself in discussions with a number of companies that are seeking a Chief Learning Officer (CLO), or the equivalent.  Many of the discussions have originated with the company’s need to move their internal training; up from some ad hoc structure into a more highly systematized educational system.

What has surprised me is the hesitancy of the companies in taking the ‘step’ to a true training program, and hiring the CLO who would be responsible for it.  It seems that many of these firms [and their management] look at training as a ‘cost center’ and has minor or irrelevant impact on the profitability of the firm.   They could not be more mistaken.

It has been my response to point out the four main attributes to a high-end training program.  These attributes are often overlooked and lost on management.  The reasons for the short-sightedness may be many, but seem to cluster around:

1) Rapid ramp-up for new employees — getting them up-to speed in dramatically quick fashion.  Far to many companies do not recognize or even tracking the value of taking new hires and fail to measure the value in  reducing the time it takes to make them proficient and revenue creating.  Far to many management teams treat this function as an HR program.  Wrong, wrong, wrong.  This is a sales and marketing matter.  Improving the time it takes to making an employee a revenue generating component is not only measurable but valuable to the bottom line.

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Identify the Reason for Training

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On May 10, 2011 NO COMMENTS

Investing in employee training is not an activity that should be taken lightly.

Unfortunately, it often is. Every day, countless organizations send their employees to one of the thousands of seminars held throughout the country. And when the employee returns to work, no one asks, “So what did you learn and how are you going to use it?” What’s worse, those same organizations may bring a training provider onsite expecting a miracle, and then after the excitement of the day wears off (assuming it was a good session) nothing really changes back on the job. Mercifully, by doing a little work up front, you can save yourself a lot of money. First, identify the reason(s) why you believe your organization needs training.

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RSDR 5: Development 2

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On November 30, 2010 NO COMMENTS

As we’ve discussed, development is a primary role for training, but there are ways that HR and training can cross in this important function. We’ve looked at more traditional forms of development, so now let’s examine other development avenues for training and HR.

One of the first avenues for employee development is through career paths and curriculum development. In terms of curriculum, training is usually going to work with managers, supervisors, and the people who do the jobs in order to determine what competencies or skills are included in training programs. This in itself is a form of development, but consider taking it a step further to career paths. The career path is essentially a collection of curricula that make up the most logical steps in an employee’s development. This could mean moving from one position to another within one area of expertise, or taking a logical step into another area. For example, call center employees can logically move into supervisory roles from lower positions, but in some situations they can also move into roles such as analysis or quality assurance. With career paths, HR is the training department’s definite partner. HR can tell you which positions people are moving to and from, as well as how department and division managers envision those career steps. In addition, just as you can give feedback on success in new hire training, HR can provide a profile of who works best when promoted into certain roles. For example, the call center supervisors may be more people oriented, whereas the quality assurance position may require more analytical skill. Career paths that are developed as a partnership with HR will be accurate and will also help increase the credibility of the training program as a whole.

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RSDR 4: Development

By Bryant Nielson, Managing Director On November 23, 2010 NO COMMENTS

The development of human capital is a primary role for training. Development can come in many forms, which we will review. However, we will take a different view on development by determining how we can best leverage HR in this all-important facet of day-to-day business.

First, let’s examine formal training programs, such as classroom, online, and social-media based learning. Depending on your organization and its scope, you may have formal training in place for just about every position. Or, you may have a formal training program that serves as a “funnel” for the rest of the organization. Your formal training program may be a blended approach, where participants attend class and then go to online learning interventions, but it may also use one approach or the other. However your formal training is structured, you can rely on HR to help you evaluate and improve each component. You are probably already evaluating training from the participant and supervisor perspective, but have you ever considered going in tandem with HR to evaluate training?

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